?

Log in

Writer's Block

Listen Up!

What's your reaction towards people who are outspoken about their beliefs (whether that's politics, religion, or anything else)? Does your reaction change based on whether you agree with them or not?

Answers (20)

  • Doesn't bother me at all! I'm a pretty outspoken conservative, and most issues of the day I've got an opinion of in some form or another. The beauty of the Constitution is that, by law, everybody is allowed to have a voice. If somebody has an opinion on something that is different than mine, how is that a bad thing? The whole idea is to get the discussions and debates going so we can figure out what will work best. If we have a debate, there are two people, and both of them agree, one of them isn't really necessary. By that logic, dissenting opinions are encouraged. Or at least they should be.
  • I respect everyone's opinion when it comes to politics or religion because those two subjects I tend to stay away from because I'm very neutral when I hear about those two subjects. E
  • I'm initially guarded. If I feel it's not a caustic environment, I may even share my opinion, and also if I feel I'm knowledgeable enough about it. I don't have a problem with folks who are outspoken, you have a right to share your beliefs. I also have a right to disagree. And we should all try to be civil about it. I'm working on being a better listener and better communicator, for my part.
  • Nothing wrong with being passionate, in fact if it matters to you then in my mind you SHOULD be outspoken. I personally don't get people who keep quiet to 'keep the peace' or 'get along' because all that happens is the truth comes out eventually. Keeping it in isn't healthy, and is sneaky. I personally prefer to know where people stand rather than to be wrong-footed, I get quite annoyed when someone seems at total odds to what they were presenting and they're like 'so?' - especially on important issues, like LGBTQ rights, religion, politics etc. Hiding who you are from me just makes me suspicious of someone rather than what they probably want which is some kind of social grooming. And anyway, when you have discussions or arguments with people then their true nature comes out - if they are insulting or illogical, petty or pedantic (I can be all of those, but try not to be) it tells you what kind of a friend those people are, what assumptions they've made and what strategy they choose tells you a lot about their internal makeup. More than they think. I don't expect friends to agree with my opinions, quite often they don't, but I do expect them to have some sort of logic/thinking behind it, even if it's not mine. If I can see where they stand, then it's fine...if it's fluffy or not thought out but they are putting it out there, I'm less kind about it, usually. That said, I try and avoid arguments unless it's someone who is being hella illogical or offensive, or completely out of what I think is their usual character.
  • I have one rule: I'll give them the treatment I'd want if I was the one speaking. Period. Even if I disagree, I won't insult them or offend them in any way. I don't give them a reply unless they ask me to (I see no problem in this, but you know how some people are when defending their beliefs, especially the ones who call themselves 'open-minded'! In my personal experience, those have been the worst, I don't understand what's the logic in that, but oh well...). And if they're being rude, I just ignore them. What's the point of arguing with someone who's obviously not smart enough to understand the basic principle of respecting others? I have better things to do with my time, honestly.
  • It depends on how you define "outspoken". If you take "outspoken" to mean "shoves it down your throat as the only option available", then I will avoid if possible to the point of refusing to attend a function in which they take part. If "outspoken" just means they will talk about the belief in question at every opportunity, but they are open to other opinions, I can tolerate them. Unless they act entitled to knowing my opinion. Then they'd have more luck finding a pearl in a waterbear's stomach.
  • No, my reaction doesn't affect my own beliefs, I mainly state my reaction by thinking logically. I say true facts that I somehow conjured up in my past experiences, by stating the many theories that I have heard. Then I would say my own belief or I would support someone else's beliefs. I'm an open-minded person.
Previous
← Ctrl ← Alt
Next
Ctrl → Alt →