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How has technology changed the way you watch movies and listen to music?

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  • I watch movies on a DVD player now instead of a VCR.  I listen to downloaded music that I will someday get onto a ipod when I get one, so that is how technology  has changed for me.
  • I think that the biggest difference is that it's way easier to find things these days. FOr example, 10 years ago (not that I really cared much then, I was 10, but that's not the point), it was probably pretty difficult to get ahold of a copy of that new crazy martial arts movie from Taiwan that everyone loved the year before at a film festival. Now you can get on google, and usually find it within 10-20 minutes, and have it available for watching in a few days or so. Such are the wonders of torrenting. For music, I think the biggest change has come in how I discover music. I no longer get recommendations from friends, borrowing CD's or trying to rent them from the library. I can find recommendations pretty much everywhere, and there are entire websites dedicated to music that fits my tastes, and many of the forums I visit have a "What are you listening to?" thread, where it's a great way to find music. Myspace has also changed my exposure to local bands. I would never have been able to find small bands outside of my city if it werent' for myspace. Sometimes, there are even so many bands locally that you might not even know one exists. Myspace has changed that greatly.

  • TECHNOLOGY CHANGED ALOT. WHEN  WAS LITTLE I USED TO WATCH MOVIES ON VHS AND NOW I WSATCH THEM ON DVD. BUT ALSO THERE IS BLU-RAY . WHEN I WAS LITTLE I USED TO LISTEN TO TAPES AND THEN THERE WAS THE CD PLAYER AND NOW THERE ARE IPODS AND MP3 PLAYERS.ALSO TECHNOLOGY HAS COME UP WITH AN EASIER WAY TO PAY FAIR TO GET ON PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION. AND NOW THINGS ARE MORE REALYING ON ELECTRONIC DEVICES. EVEN TALKING ON THE PHONE CAN BE HANDS FREE THANKS TO THE BLUE TOOTH.
  • I believe that technology (re: movies/programs) has helped to create an atmosphere much more conducive to the suspension-of-disbelief. Let's just say that I don't have second thoughts about a Pocket Watch being a respectful receptacle for the Essence of a Time Lord & that Gallifrey may have cornered the market on Sonic Screwdrivers at some point in time. :)
  • I remember what it felt like to open up a holiday gift and find a shiny new CD, or that new DVD that I had been wanting. I couldn't wait to go to my room, pop the CD into the stereo, crank it up, and enjoy. I would flip through the booklet, check out the album artwork over and over... I even smelled the damn things. I adored it. I remember how the floor was absolutely covered with the plastic from the DVDs that the family opened up, ready to curl up on the couch together and watch the movies back to back on our little TV. Now, I know that will never happen again. I have my Mac. I buy my music on iTunes, not on CDs. I never use a stereo (I don't remember the last time I turned one on), and always use the shuffle feature on my iTunes. I buy and watch movies the same way. If I want a new album or film, someone just gets me an iTunes gift card. It seems that I no longer curl up next to my family on the couch... I watch my movies huddled over a computer screen. I can't remember the last time I used a CD (except, of course, to import it onto my Mac). I don't even pay attention to the album artwork that I once loved so much. I had almost forgotten about CD booklets... digital booklets just sit in my iTunes library, never viewed. I don't know what to say other than the fact that, despite the convenience of having my movies and music all together on a laptop and extremely accessible, technology has hindered my ability to fully appreciate a new movie or album. And I certainly remember enjoying CDs and DVDs much better. But then again, would I ever go back? Probably not. Why? I have absolutely no clue.
  • It hasn't. I've been illegally downloading music and watching movies on youtube since i was in the womb.
  • Well, thanks to a first rate audio system, a dazzling 55" TV, and an upconverting DVD player, and I do most of our movie watching at home. I'm not oxidizing benzene at $2.75 a gallon, coughing up $8 a head, and paying $4 for a tiny box of Snocaps to sit in a teeny little theater in a shopping center. I find it far more desirable to watch at home, where I can hit pause if I run out of snacks or need to consult the porcelin, and where I can sit on the sofa, where it's more convenient if canoodling with the missus is dictated. As for music, the advent of compressed-audio formats like mp3, ogg and FLAC (which I've not yet tried but plan to) mean that I can keep my entire CD collection on a few GB worth of disk space - I don't have to cart CDs back and forth to listen to music at work. Streaming audio sites on the web are handy too, as FM reception in the office is difficult at best, given the way the building is constructed. A musical benefit also accrues from the big TV/great stereo pairing. Add in all-live-music cable channels, especially in hi-def, and we can even watch concerts (often with better sound that we'd get in the venue) from the comfortable and smoke-free vantage point of the sofa in the family room. Very nice. [edit] There is a flip side to this wondrous portable-music technology - the whole concept of high fidelity, accurate reproduction of music (a hot-button issue given my family's involvement in the industry :-) ) has largely been sacrificed to expediency and portability. One cannot quite get the full scope and range of Beethoven's 9th, or the floor-to-ceiling of Roger Daltry's endless ragged scream, or the depth and subtlety of Brubeck tickling the ivories when when you're listening to a lossy-compression format on those teeny little earbuds. Ah well. It's all about tradeoffs, I guess. After all, I'm not listening to WAV rips of my CDs at work :-). Nonetheless, while we're all enthralled with our little iPods and Sansas (Yes, Virginia, there *are* other portable music players than Apple's, and some of 'em are pretty spiffy), let's not forget that those big speakers and ruler-flat electronics with huge dynamic headroom still have a place. :-) [/edit]
  • Adopt one today!Adopt one today!Adopt one today!Adopt one today!Adopt one today!Adopt one today!Adopt one today!Adopt one today! Everything is portable, to everywhere. That is the most awesome.
  • Technology has made it more difficult to listen to Rage Against the Machine because I feel like a complete bougie sell-out loser listening to Rage on a device that cost more than the annual wages of those being advocated for in Zach de la Rocha's lyrics. It makes me feel weird and sad.
  • Seems like a silly question; of course it has. It's not necessarily a matter of intentionally using the newest technology. I mean, 15 years ago we listened to casette tapes, and then it changed to CDs, and now it's mp3 players/ipods. 15 years ago, you watched VHS tapes, now it's DVDs. Let's put individual preferences aside. It's the availability of older items that determines how we change the way we do these things. You might be able to find a casette player in an old shop or online, but it is no longer a mainstream item, so people will naturally have to change the way they listen to their music eventually. VCRs are also no longer mainstream items, so people don't really have much of a choice but to get and watch DVDs. Of course, VCRs can also be found in olds shops or online, but eventually they will become completely obsolete.
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